Saturday, August 8, 2009

Guess what? Scout is a sable.

Well - we already knew that. Scout's coat and nose color DNA test results came back:

Individual Tests Result Comments

C128E Canine Coat and Nose Color Test - E EE
C128A Canine Coat and Nose Color Test - A ayat
C128B Canine Coat and Nose Color Test - B BB
C128M Canine Coat and Nose Color Test - M EmE

Notes:
Genotype EmEBBayat: sable with mask, nose color - black, hidden colors - black-and-tan and lack of mask.

OK - all you genetic junkies out there - what does this mean? Any chance of making something other than red puppies? (Not that there is anything wrong with red puppies, but we would love the chance to have a little variety.)

12 comments:

Baledwr said...

Breed her to a brindle or brindle pointed tri for brindles as brindle is dominant to red.

Bred to black she will produce brindle pointed tris and if they carry tan points will produce tan pointed tris.

Breed to a red for only reds (and if they carry tri to get blacks as well as red is dominant to black)

Muddy enough

penni said...

What she said! I think it would be a hoot to have a litter with reds, blacks and brindles.

Kaye said...

Variety is wonderful, but I have always wanted a gorgeous sable like Scout!! So I say breed to a Tan PT Tri or Sable/Red :)))

dreameyce said...

EVERYONE wants a red like Scout, so why would you WANT anything but reds ;0P

As Mandy said, yes, you can breed her to other colors, to get other colors. If you bred her to a homozygous brindle, the whole litter, would be brindles even.

penni said...

Scout is beautiful because she is beautiful. Her sable color is rich, but her body and her movement closely approach ideal. So, it doesn't matter if she's sable/red, brindle, tri, or blue. I'll take her in any color. There is no bad color for a good Cardi. I still think it would be fun to see l'll Scouts in other colors, too.

dreameyce said...

Penni- you seem to have missed the winking smiley face. I was being sarcastic. I agree, Scout would be beautiful in any color.

That being said, many breeders, and Cardi fanciers I talk to, dream of that top-quality red, like Scout. They sadly, don't seem to happen in the breed often, since most judges over look the reds.

Kaye said...

Hmm maybe we should switch topic too linebreeding vs outcross, I always thought that would make a good discussion. And then structure and then color....

dreameyce said...

Kaye- linebreeding is generally seen as strengthening what's already there, by breeding complimentary animals who're closely related, while outcrossing is done to bring new traits, not seen in the existing line, in.

The exact definition of linebreeding, and outcrossing within purebred dogs is very hotly debated though, as it could technically be argued, esp in rarer breeds, that all litters are linebred, and that in some breeds, 'outcrossing' is impossible.

Since the terms are loosely defined, and based mostly on personal opinion, debates do often happen.

The only discussion I know of in Cardi blogdom so far, has been on the rufflyspeaking blog. Joanna has discussed linebreeding, inbreeding, and general genetics a bit, with discussions occurring in the comments. Very interesting reads, with lots of input. You'd have to dig through her archives to find them though.

Kaye said...

Yes I know the difference actually, but have been noticing some first time litters lately that are total outcrosses and am very surprised by this.

(sorry Janet for switching topics!!!)

Holly said...

I bred my brindle pointed black to a brindle - and we got a rainbow! A red (sable), brindle pointed tri, tan pointed tri and a brindle. This was Sabrina's first litter.

Scout is a GORGEOUS bitch and I am sure she will produce just as nice for you, no matter what color!

Dina said...

Hey! I'd just like to know when you are planning to have little Scouts? Do we have to start shopping for baby gifts anytime soon?

Oh, and bred to a red that is black factored, you could also get more sables :)

Janet said...

Next spring! Or more likely early summer assuming she sticks to her usual schedule of May - November seasons.